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Matt Freak Flag

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  1. Haha
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from PetroL in Tips for atmospheric/psychill sound synthesis   
    Hey OP - can you post an example of anything you are making (or, an example of a song that does this really well that you like) ?
     
    Some ideas for pads:
     
    - Are you layering stuff?  A lot of great pad sounds are 2 or 3 or more pads layered (with one pad providing the low-mid warmth, another providing maybe the mid-range melodic component, and another providing the top-end shimmer).
     
    - What synths are you using/ are you only using synths?  Stretched-out melodic sounds, especially reversed, drenched in reverb can make amazing, organic pads that no one has ever heard before.  Synths like Omnisphere or Alchemy have lots of samples already for doing this, but you can just do it manually using warping in Ableton / Flex Time in Logic / etc.  
     
    - You said you are EQing out the mid frequencies - which ones?  I usually use pads to add extra warmth, movement, and depth into the mid frequencies.
     
    - EQ the left and the right channel differently!  I like to boost and cut a few frequencies differently on left and right channels to increase width.  Even better, slowly automate a different peak on each left/right channels.
     
    - Delay, chorus, reverb are all good for this, but can maybe sound bland if they are just used as static effects.  Do you automate your reverb sends or chorus amounts?  
    Some ideas:
    -- My favourite: I like to automate the reverb send up while automating a lo-pass filter down on the original pad.  This will make it sound like it is moving farther away, giving a great sense of front-to-back depth.  The reverse works well, too.  Or with a hi-pass filter.  
    -- Try a chorus with a very low rate but high intensity, automate the mix from 20% to 80% every 1/2/4 beats, then quickly back down.  This will make it sound like it is "pumping" from centred to wide with each pulse of the beat.  I like to combine this with regular side-chaining to a kick etc.  
    -- Old trick: automate the delay send, and then send that delay to itself.  Be careful because this might get loud, but if we do it carefully, we can make a pad (or any sound) turn into a completely different, ultra organic ambient soundscape of throbbing echoes.  If you want width, use a stereo delay (or maybe a flanger/phaser on the delay channel).  
     
    - Panning rather than widening... less is often more in production.  If you make everything detuned and wide, your song doesn't sound wide - it sounds like stereo mud. Panning some sounds left and some sounds right - and especially automating the pan - is often way better than just making something wide.  
     
    - Autopan plugins are great, but I like to automate the rate or width to keep them from sounding static.
     
    - Sometimes mono reverbs work really well for localizing a sound in the mix. I like to make sounds panned left, send it to a mono reverb channel, panned right.  On its own, this isn't as impressive as a big wide wet delay.  But in the mix, it is sometimes so much more spacious.  We can do the same with delay - then maybe try automating the pan of that delay from right to left again.  
     
    - Same philosophy, polyphony: too much polyphony can also make things unfocused, especially when working with bass/pads/atmospheres/multiple melodies.  Sometimes I like to think like in jazz, where the bass can play the root note and the pads can play the 3rd/7th/9th etc.  Leaves a lot of harmonic space for melodic instruments.
     
    - My other favourite: you need a microphone to do this, but even a cheap microphone is fine because we are trying to make weird sounds anyways right? Solo the pad you want, put the microphone somewhere in the room, maybe pointed at a wall away from the speakers, or even in the hallway, whatever... record 8 or 16 bars.  Move the microphone around to a totally different spot, do it again.  Then, pan one recording left and the other right.  We should have a very wide sounding pad, with lots of room echoes and reflections making it organic and interesting.  
     
    I have a million more ideas if this is helpful at all.  Just remember - there is such a thing as too wide.  1 ultra-wide sound and 4 sounds swirling in automated panning will sound bigger and more spacious than 5 ultra-wide sounds.  
  2. Thanks
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from PetroL in EQing   
    I EQ as I go, but I don't worry about getting it "perfect" right away.  Unless I have to render the channel for some reason, simple EQing doesn't take much CPU, so I can mess around with it as needed until I'm ready to render a track.
     
    Kicks may get EQed to sound punchier/less boxy/more subby.  Snares may get EQed to have more bite or sizzle.  Hats usually get EQed to take off the low end.  
     
    I'll EQ my drum bus before it goes into a few layers of saturation/compression (to control what gets distorted), and I'll EQ it after if it needs it (for overall drum balance).
     
    I ruthlessly hipass anything with too much low end energy if it conflicts with the bass or kick.  
     
    I try not to EQ using EQ plugins if I can help it.  If my saturator has a filter built in, I'll use that, for example.  Or I'll just use different distortions themselves to boost/cut the lows or highs.
     
    Synths and recorded sounds will get EQed if they need it to fit the mix, but while I don't think there is anything wrong with a 16db cut or boost if you need it, major EQing to fit a sound into the mix is often a strong sign that I should have chosen sounds that didn't clash so much.  Usually, I'll just change a synth or take something out entirely rather than try to wrestle with infinite mud.
     
    I have a nice gentle EQ on my master because I see no reason not to.  I used to avoid this because everyone told me this is a bad idea.  But more often then not, a 3db cut or boost on the master actually sounds better (to me anyways) than going back and working with individual channels. An EQ on the master really makes me feel in control of the overall feel and vibe of my mix.  YMMV.  
     
    Everyone seems to do their own thing or have their own "rules" for EQing.  Curious to see what other people's workflow is.  But I do think blanket advice like "never boost more than +6db" is misleading, especially with synthetic music.  Who is anyone to decide what a squelchy space fart is supposed to sound like "naturally?"  
  3. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Vyomanaut in Tips for atmospheric/psychill sound synthesis   
    Hey OP - can you post an example of anything you are making (or, an example of a song that does this really well that you like) ?
     
    Some ideas for pads:
     
    - Are you layering stuff?  A lot of great pad sounds are 2 or 3 or more pads layered (with one pad providing the low-mid warmth, another providing maybe the mid-range melodic component, and another providing the top-end shimmer).
     
    - What synths are you using/ are you only using synths?  Stretched-out melodic sounds, especially reversed, drenched in reverb can make amazing, organic pads that no one has ever heard before.  Synths like Omnisphere or Alchemy have lots of samples already for doing this, but you can just do it manually using warping in Ableton / Flex Time in Logic / etc.  
     
    - You said you are EQing out the mid frequencies - which ones?  I usually use pads to add extra warmth, movement, and depth into the mid frequencies.
     
    - EQ the left and the right channel differently!  I like to boost and cut a few frequencies differently on left and right channels to increase width.  Even better, slowly automate a different peak on each left/right channels.
     
    - Delay, chorus, reverb are all good for this, but can maybe sound bland if they are just used as static effects.  Do you automate your reverb sends or chorus amounts?  
    Some ideas:
    -- My favourite: I like to automate the reverb send up while automating a lo-pass filter down on the original pad.  This will make it sound like it is moving farther away, giving a great sense of front-to-back depth.  The reverse works well, too.  Or with a hi-pass filter.  
    -- Try a chorus with a very low rate but high intensity, automate the mix from 20% to 80% every 1/2/4 beats, then quickly back down.  This will make it sound like it is "pumping" from centred to wide with each pulse of the beat.  I like to combine this with regular side-chaining to a kick etc.  
    -- Old trick: automate the delay send, and then send that delay to itself.  Be careful because this might get loud, but if we do it carefully, we can make a pad (or any sound) turn into a completely different, ultra organic ambient soundscape of throbbing echoes.  If you want width, use a stereo delay (or maybe a flanger/phaser on the delay channel).  
     
    - Panning rather than widening... less is often more in production.  If you make everything detuned and wide, your song doesn't sound wide - it sounds like stereo mud. Panning some sounds left and some sounds right - and especially automating the pan - is often way better than just making something wide.  
     
    - Autopan plugins are great, but I like to automate the rate or width to keep them from sounding static.
     
    - Sometimes mono reverbs work really well for localizing a sound in the mix. I like to make sounds panned left, send it to a mono reverb channel, panned right.  On its own, this isn't as impressive as a big wide wet delay.  But in the mix, it is sometimes so much more spacious.  We can do the same with delay - then maybe try automating the pan of that delay from right to left again.  
     
    - Same philosophy, polyphony: too much polyphony can also make things unfocused, especially when working with bass/pads/atmospheres/multiple melodies.  Sometimes I like to think like in jazz, where the bass can play the root note and the pads can play the 3rd/7th/9th etc.  Leaves a lot of harmonic space for melodic instruments.
     
    - My other favourite: you need a microphone to do this, but even a cheap microphone is fine because we are trying to make weird sounds anyways right? Solo the pad you want, put the microphone somewhere in the room, maybe pointed at a wall away from the speakers, or even in the hallway, whatever... record 8 or 16 bars.  Move the microphone around to a totally different spot, do it again.  Then, pan one recording left and the other right.  We should have a very wide sounding pad, with lots of room echoes and reflections making it organic and interesting.  
     
    I have a million more ideas if this is helpful at all.  Just remember - there is such a thing as too wide.  1 ultra-wide sound and 4 sounds swirling in automated panning will sound bigger and more spacious than 5 ultra-wide sounds.  
  4. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from scorchio in 432Hz/440Hz   
    Or even in most music with (western) acoustic instrumentation.  For example, my guitar is pretty much stuck in equal temperament because that's how instruments are fretted.
     
    Now gamelan music, on the other hand... tuning for gamelan ensembles is a whole rabbit hole of weird.  
     
    Edit: alright, I just learned this: some of that eerie intense music from Akira was gamelan music in pelog tuning. See here.
  5. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Hermetech Mastering in What Equipement do you use?   
    How... just how do people use rotary mixers?  
     
    I don't DJ, but I can't even imagine doing a live set without faders.  How do you spin a rotary encoder fast enough to DJ with?  
     
    That Condesa Lucia is maybe the sexiest mixer I've ever seen, but I'm amazed that people are making the encoder thing work in a live setting.   
  6. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Hermetech Mastering in Limiter on your master? To use or not to use!   
    Anyone tried DMG Limitless? 
     
    It's beastly. 
     
    My demo expired and I feel lonely... Not that I think this is a good idea, but you can slam like 6db off your master with it and it doesn't sound messed up.  If I did that with Logic's limiter, it would sound awful.  Fabfilter limiter is good for individual channels.
     
    Another question: does anyone else creatively use clipping/softclipping/tape-ish-clipping not on your master - say on drums?  I am having a lot of fun doing terrible things to my drum buss these days.  Wouldn't try it on a rock song (gotta stay punchy), but I'm seriously vibing on pulverized breakbeats these days.     
  7. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to Iacchus in Newbie producer looking for advice   
    I wouldnt advise mixing on headphones, if you want your bass to behave itself, no matter how good they are.
     
    In terms of general production advice, look at formant filtering, using that when making your squelch noises has some great results.. thats something that hasnt been mentioned here
     
    I wouldnt say any particular technique is especially important though, just lay down some beats and some synths etc, then repeat for several years until you start to get good at making the noises you like.  Get a really good synth and learn it inside out, dont be fooled into thinking the next toy will make all the difference, it is better to know 1 tool really well than to have tons lying around and not know any of them that well.
  8. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Lorn in Newbie producer looking for advice   
    Well, for the squelches, Psilocybian posted this to the Isratrance boards a while back and I think most people do something similar.  Slow it way down for a gnarly grow, or, for extra squishiness, use some FM instead of simple oscillators.  Generally, a saw-wave modulator precisely 2 octaves below a sine-wave carrier is a good starting point here.  When the modulator is at sub-audio or nearly sub-audio frequencies, you get that ripping squelchy lead sound that makes up like... half of the leads in forest psy.
     
    "Trance-gated" or just gated stuff can be made all sorts of ways; you could just make a pad or vocal and chop it up manually, for maximum control.  However, I prefer the side chain method: Set up your pad or vocal, plug a gate on the channel, and side-chain the gate (with a near-instant attack and release) to your second channel, which is just any old synth running a whatever kind of oscillator.  Make a staccato note pattern on that second channel; don't worry about the notes, just the pattern, and remember to leave enough of space between notes.  When you turn off the audio output of this second channel, your staccato pattern is now controlling the audio that gets through from the first channel.  In Ableton, I think you can just "slice to midi" or something.  And, of course, there are a zillion different plugins that do this, although you'll usually sacrifice some precise control over the pattern that you'd get with the more tedious manual methods.  Xfer LFO Tool is probably the best bang for buck, and it's useful in a hundred other situations, too.  
     
    The sample-and-hold sequence is very simple but IMO is the best and most versatile classic psy sound.  Throw your favourite harmonically-rich oscillator (a saw will do) onto your favourite synth (that has a band pass filter).  Set the band-pass filter somewhere in the middle-ish, with high resonance, but not quite so much that it self oscillates.  Modulate the frequency of that band-pass filter with a sample-and-hold LFO (the random stairstep looking one that most synths have; might also be called "random step" or even just "random"). Chose 1/16note as the speed of the LFO.  Throw a stereo delay and some reverb on that channel, and you have instant psychedelic goodness.  That's just a starting point - you can use the S&H LFO to modulate literally anything and it will probably sound cool: oscillator type, distortion amount, resonance, FM amount, pitch, amount of reverb, all of the above, etc.  Try with different filter types, try with parallel filters, try with no filter...
  9. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Lorn in Newbie producer looking for advice   
    Welcome to the forum
     
    I'm actually pretty similar to you musically.  While I don't care for trap, my live set right now ranges from downtempo breaks and psybient-infused trip-hop to midtempo glitchy funk.  I also chose Logic for production, though I still have to hack my way through Ableton (slowly) for performing.  I also use a guitar a lot, too: for my chill sets, mostly on soundscapes dripping with reverb; for, the dancier stuff, it's all about that clean 70s Strat spank. 
     
    You've got awesome gear already - top notch albums have been made with far less, so don't let anyone tell you you need this or that flavor-of-the-week.  What's your monitoring situation, though?  Good monitors are invaluable.  They don't have to be ridiculously good, but headphones or stereo speakers are NOT acceptable substitutes in my experience.  KRK Rokit 5 (not 8), entry level JBLs, or used Adams or Dynaudios would be my suggestions on a budget. 
     
    As for synths, the fact that you have Logic and therefor Alchemy means you already have what was until recently considered a top-tier third-party soft synth rivaling the likes of Omnisphere etc.  If you learn Alchemy inside and out, that will serve you forever, and you will always find new ways to use it creatively. 
     
    As for what to learn... I'm not sure what your current skill level is, so forgive me if something I say is either too simple or too complicated. 
     
    I don't know much about trap percussion, but I think the same rules apply as with any other genre.  Mainly, sample selection is king.  More often than not, no amount of processing will substitute for a well-picked (or, well-made) sample.  Can't polish a turd and all, and it's easy to suck the life out of your sounds if you try.  If I could go back and do one thing differently from day 1, I would spend less time polishing turds and more time keeping a better organized, well-curated sample library.  20 kicks that you like and can actually use are worth far more than 3000 unsorted kicks with 100 you might use but never be able to find, endlessly digging through samples while your creativity finds a corner in which to hang itself.
     
    If you're making bass music, you'll want to know the basics of... well, bass.  Yes, sidechain compression is a staple of the genre.  The now ubiquitous "wobble" or "wub" is a staple, too, and I'm of the opinion that making a good wobble takes a minute to learn and a lifetime to master.  I'd learn what a Reese bass is, too, and at least a few methods of making one.  Both wobbles and Reeses can be aggressive and heavy or mellow and smooth depending on your execution.  
     
    For the psybient stuff... there's a few staple sounds in psytrance/psybient that are worth at least learning, but you don't need to use them everywhere (or at all).  The psy-squelch or psy-fart, the trance gated pad or vocal, the sample-and-hold sequence, and more than I can think of are all still used all the time.  Time-honored techniques like the dub delay are used in virtually every genre. 
     
    If you work with vocals, consider learning a few advanced techniques.  Pre-compression, an underused form of side-chain compression, is amazing on vocals (or anything else) and surprisingly easy to do; learning how and when to use pitch correction is also key.  Logic has a very useable pitch-correction plugin, great for creative spacey auto-tuned effects. 
     
    Logic's compressor is awesome for a built-in plugin.  Learn the models - they are very different from one another.  I think an oscilloscope is a ridiculously useful tool for learning how different plugins shape a sound, especially if you find that you like to learn visually.  It's fantastic for watching how distortion changes a waveform, for example, and how this relates to your headroom. 
     
    Learn everything there is to know about Flex Time in Logic.  You'll find it's useful everywhere: from creative time stretching, to correcting performances after-the-fact, to chopping up drum loops... it's extremely well programmed, and the algorithms sound great. 
     
    Make sure you learn about sends and bussing and using auxiliary channels for reverb and delay.  To give you a starting point, I start with 4 different reverb aux channels and 4 differing delay aux channels on any given track, and just send whatever to them as needed.
     
    Don't be afraid to customize your hotkeys in logic.  Alt+K opens up the keyboard command list.  I have a ton of custom commands that I would never want to be without. 
     
    Eh, that's all I can think of at the moment. 
     
    Try things out and experiment at LEAST as much as you follow manuals and tutorials.  Alchemy alone is so expansive that you could watch every tutorial on earth and there would still be creative ways left to discover. 
     
    Twist knobs and have fun. 
     
    See my signature. 
  10. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to neil (spatialize) in Snare reverb   
    you use logic?  There's a Big Drum Room impulse in there.  That is very nice on snares or on a full loop (filtered a little maybe). 
     
    Plus I find a bit of either spring reverb  or plate on top of something like that is the way forward. The big drum reverb to add depth and the spring (or a plate) to add a bit of a ring or upper / mid freq spaciousness to the sound.. 
     
    So yeah I find a couple of subtle applications of 2 types of reverb works best for me.
  11. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from andorra in Newbie producer looking for advice   
    Welcome to the forum
     
    I'm actually pretty similar to you musically.  While I don't care for trap, my live set right now ranges from downtempo breaks and psybient-infused trip-hop to midtempo glitchy funk.  I also chose Logic for production, though I still have to hack my way through Ableton (slowly) for performing.  I also use a guitar a lot, too: for my chill sets, mostly on soundscapes dripping with reverb; for, the dancier stuff, it's all about that clean 70s Strat spank. 
     
    You've got awesome gear already - top notch albums have been made with far less, so don't let anyone tell you you need this or that flavor-of-the-week.  What's your monitoring situation, though?  Good monitors are invaluable.  They don't have to be ridiculously good, but headphones or stereo speakers are NOT acceptable substitutes in my experience.  KRK Rokit 5 (not 8), entry level JBLs, or used Adams or Dynaudios would be my suggestions on a budget. 
     
    As for synths, the fact that you have Logic and therefor Alchemy means you already have what was until recently considered a top-tier third-party soft synth rivaling the likes of Omnisphere etc.  If you learn Alchemy inside and out, that will serve you forever, and you will always find new ways to use it creatively. 
     
    As for what to learn... I'm not sure what your current skill level is, so forgive me if something I say is either too simple or too complicated. 
     
    I don't know much about trap percussion, but I think the same rules apply as with any other genre.  Mainly, sample selection is king.  More often than not, no amount of processing will substitute for a well-picked (or, well-made) sample.  Can't polish a turd and all, and it's easy to suck the life out of your sounds if you try.  If I could go back and do one thing differently from day 1, I would spend less time polishing turds and more time keeping a better organized, well-curated sample library.  20 kicks that you like and can actually use are worth far more than 3000 unsorted kicks with 100 you might use but never be able to find, endlessly digging through samples while your creativity finds a corner in which to hang itself.
     
    If you're making bass music, you'll want to know the basics of... well, bass.  Yes, sidechain compression is a staple of the genre.  The now ubiquitous "wobble" or "wub" is a staple, too, and I'm of the opinion that making a good wobble takes a minute to learn and a lifetime to master.  I'd learn what a Reese bass is, too, and at least a few methods of making one.  Both wobbles and Reeses can be aggressive and heavy or mellow and smooth depending on your execution.  
     
    For the psybient stuff... there's a few staple sounds in psytrance/psybient that are worth at least learning, but you don't need to use them everywhere (or at all).  The psy-squelch or psy-fart, the trance gated pad or vocal, the sample-and-hold sequence, and more than I can think of are all still used all the time.  Time-honored techniques like the dub delay are used in virtually every genre. 
     
    If you work with vocals, consider learning a few advanced techniques.  Pre-compression, an underused form of side-chain compression, is amazing on vocals (or anything else) and surprisingly easy to do; learning how and when to use pitch correction is also key.  Logic has a very useable pitch-correction plugin, great for creative spacey auto-tuned effects. 
     
    Logic's compressor is awesome for a built-in plugin.  Learn the models - they are very different from one another.  I think an oscilloscope is a ridiculously useful tool for learning how different plugins shape a sound, especially if you find that you like to learn visually.  It's fantastic for watching how distortion changes a waveform, for example, and how this relates to your headroom. 
     
    Learn everything there is to know about Flex Time in Logic.  You'll find it's useful everywhere: from creative time stretching, to correcting performances after-the-fact, to chopping up drum loops... it's extremely well programmed, and the algorithms sound great. 
     
    Make sure you learn about sends and bussing and using auxiliary channels for reverb and delay.  To give you a starting point, I start with 4 different reverb aux channels and 4 differing delay aux channels on any given track, and just send whatever to them as needed.
     
    Don't be afraid to customize your hotkeys in logic.  Alt+K opens up the keyboard command list.  I have a ton of custom commands that I would never want to be without. 
     
    Eh, that's all I can think of at the moment. 
     
    Try things out and experiment at LEAST as much as you follow manuals and tutorials.  Alchemy alone is so expansive that you could watch every tutorial on earth and there would still be creative ways left to discover. 
     
    Twist knobs and have fun. 
     
    See my signature. 
  12. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to Gagarin Project in Newbie producer looking for advice   
    we are collecting tutorials here => http://forum.psybient.org/index.php/topic/32-links-to-tutorials-and-other-useful-resources/
    feel welcome to add yours or comment the one you find useful
  13. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from via'on in Newbie producer looking for advice   
    Welcome to the forum
     
    I'm actually pretty similar to you musically.  While I don't care for trap, my live set right now ranges from downtempo breaks and psybient-infused trip-hop to midtempo glitchy funk.  I also chose Logic for production, though I still have to hack my way through Ableton (slowly) for performing.  I also use a guitar a lot, too: for my chill sets, mostly on soundscapes dripping with reverb; for, the dancier stuff, it's all about that clean 70s Strat spank. 
     
    You've got awesome gear already - top notch albums have been made with far less, so don't let anyone tell you you need this or that flavor-of-the-week.  What's your monitoring situation, though?  Good monitors are invaluable.  They don't have to be ridiculously good, but headphones or stereo speakers are NOT acceptable substitutes in my experience.  KRK Rokit 5 (not 8), entry level JBLs, or used Adams or Dynaudios would be my suggestions on a budget. 
     
    As for synths, the fact that you have Logic and therefor Alchemy means you already have what was until recently considered a top-tier third-party soft synth rivaling the likes of Omnisphere etc.  If you learn Alchemy inside and out, that will serve you forever, and you will always find new ways to use it creatively. 
     
    As for what to learn... I'm not sure what your current skill level is, so forgive me if something I say is either too simple or too complicated. 
     
    I don't know much about trap percussion, but I think the same rules apply as with any other genre.  Mainly, sample selection is king.  More often than not, no amount of processing will substitute for a well-picked (or, well-made) sample.  Can't polish a turd and all, and it's easy to suck the life out of your sounds if you try.  If I could go back and do one thing differently from day 1, I would spend less time polishing turds and more time keeping a better organized, well-curated sample library.  20 kicks that you like and can actually use are worth far more than 3000 unsorted kicks with 100 you might use but never be able to find, endlessly digging through samples while your creativity finds a corner in which to hang itself.
     
    If you're making bass music, you'll want to know the basics of... well, bass.  Yes, sidechain compression is a staple of the genre.  The now ubiquitous "wobble" or "wub" is a staple, too, and I'm of the opinion that making a good wobble takes a minute to learn and a lifetime to master.  I'd learn what a Reese bass is, too, and at least a few methods of making one.  Both wobbles and Reeses can be aggressive and heavy or mellow and smooth depending on your execution.  
     
    For the psybient stuff... there's a few staple sounds in psytrance/psybient that are worth at least learning, but you don't need to use them everywhere (or at all).  The psy-squelch or psy-fart, the trance gated pad or vocal, the sample-and-hold sequence, and more than I can think of are all still used all the time.  Time-honored techniques like the dub delay are used in virtually every genre. 
     
    If you work with vocals, consider learning a few advanced techniques.  Pre-compression, an underused form of side-chain compression, is amazing on vocals (or anything else) and surprisingly easy to do; learning how and when to use pitch correction is also key.  Logic has a very useable pitch-correction plugin, great for creative spacey auto-tuned effects. 
     
    Logic's compressor is awesome for a built-in plugin.  Learn the models - they are very different from one another.  I think an oscilloscope is a ridiculously useful tool for learning how different plugins shape a sound, especially if you find that you like to learn visually.  It's fantastic for watching how distortion changes a waveform, for example, and how this relates to your headroom. 
     
    Learn everything there is to know about Flex Time in Logic.  You'll find it's useful everywhere: from creative time stretching, to correcting performances after-the-fact, to chopping up drum loops... it's extremely well programmed, and the algorithms sound great. 
     
    Make sure you learn about sends and bussing and using auxiliary channels for reverb and delay.  To give you a starting point, I start with 4 different reverb aux channels and 4 differing delay aux channels on any given track, and just send whatever to them as needed.
     
    Don't be afraid to customize your hotkeys in logic.  Alt+K opens up the keyboard command list.  I have a ton of custom commands that I would never want to be without. 
     
    Eh, that's all I can think of at the moment. 
     
    Try things out and experiment at LEAST as much as you follow manuals and tutorials.  Alchemy alone is so expansive that you could watch every tutorial on earth and there would still be creative ways left to discover. 
     
    Twist knobs and have fun. 
     
    See my signature. 
  14. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to EmptyCloud432 in Newbie producer looking for advice   
    Hello all! My apologies if this sort of thread is discouraged here. I have been dabbling in production for a few years, but just started getting serious after switching from Ableton to Logic Pro X. Almost immediately things are clicking for me in Logic that took months of agonizing study in Ableton, and I am starting to crystallize my desires in sound creation in a fashion that is giving me hope that the sounds in my head can finally come out and be shared with the world.
     
    I am looking for experienced downtempo bass music/psybient producers willing to illuminate for me some of the techniques that I should be focusing on learning. I don't require deep instruction or anything as I have got many gigabytes of videos about Logic and Alchemy and such to watch over the next couple months. Just looking for a basic "hey, you should learn this stutter edit technique, or learn to gate vocals, or learn how to sidechain".
     
    My music is coming out a blend of psybient and more trap focused bass music with my passions of shoegazer/ambient/Dream-pop/post-rock with my electric guitar. i am also an experienced vocalist/lyricist/beatboxer with an acoustic band as my other project so I will be adding lots of vocals and vocal sound effects to my work.
     
    My Rig is as follows:
    2012 Macbook Pro, soon to be upgraded to 16gb RAM and a new SSD
    Nektar Impact LX49 MIDI controller
    Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 interface
    2x behringer XM8500 Dynamic Mics
    Logic Pro X (and Mainstage)
    G&L ASAT Bluesboy Classic electric guitar
     
     
    Thank you for your sage wisdom , friends <3
     
     
    TLDR : I would love to know what techniques are the best for a budding psychill producer to learn. No need to go into detail, just the name of the technique is fine. Blessings.
     
  15. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to neil (spatialize) in 432Hz/440Hz   
    The real conspiracy is that people who play off conspiracy theories against each other are trying to degrade the notion that there is anything conspiratorial going on in the world at all and thus produce a generation of sheep who have the notion of conspiracy debunked. thus I deduce Matt the you are a high powered venusian lizard who will suck out my brains with a straw as soon as look at me.
     
    ;-)
  16. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to neil (spatialize) in Percussion   
    i've already used a couple of those breakbeats matt.  
  17. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from andorra in Percussion   
    Alright, here's three... I warned you they weren't organized.
     
    This one is my biggest lump, with just raw vinyl breaks, many in stereo.  And I do mean raw.  A lot of them have some degree of vinyl artifacts (including ultra-low frequency stuff, in stereo!), but hey, that's part of the charm, right?
     
    Here's another one with some overlap, but the rips seem cleaner (maybe some are from remastered CDs?) and there is often a few seconds of the original song on either side.  Probably my go-to versions of "Impeach the President" and "God Made Me Funky," and an epically clean and complete stereo "Scorpio."   
     
    And this one is just a few already sped up to Drum n' Bass tempos, if you're into that sort of thing.  Most or all are in mono, though.    
     
    There's plenty of the classics in both; the first one has tons of stuff I'd never heard of before, too.  
     
    Hopefully y'all find this useful and/or find some breaks you didn't have before.  
  18. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Lorn in Percussion   
    Alright, here's three... I warned you they weren't organized.
     
    This one is my biggest lump, with just raw vinyl breaks, many in stereo.  And I do mean raw.  A lot of them have some degree of vinyl artifacts (including ultra-low frequency stuff, in stereo!), but hey, that's part of the charm, right?
     
    Here's another one with some overlap, but the rips seem cleaner (maybe some are from remastered CDs?) and there is often a few seconds of the original song on either side.  Probably my go-to versions of "Impeach the President" and "God Made Me Funky," and an epically clean and complete stereo "Scorpio."   
     
    And this one is just a few already sped up to Drum n' Bass tempos, if you're into that sort of thing.  Most or all are in mono, though.    
     
    There's plenty of the classics in both; the first one has tons of stuff I'd never heard of before, too.  
     
    Hopefully y'all find this useful and/or find some breaks you didn't have before.  
  19. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to neil (spatialize) in Percussion   
    www.aerodrums.com
     
    Anyone seen this?
  20. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from neil (spatialize) in Percussion   
    +1
     
    I'm so glad other people do this too!  I pretty much never use the same percussion I started with.  First thing I do in a song is usually build drums and bass, but I'll almost always change the drums out later.  
     
    Drums are important for the vibe of a track; the right or wrong snare can make or break the feeling of a whole song.  Sometimes, just the reverb on the snare can make or break the sound of a song.  How am I supposed to know the vibe of the whole tune before it's made?  I'm not that good.  I like figuring things out as I go.  
     
    On another note, I've been using Logic's Drummer in weird ways to get interesting sounds.  It's meant to be an easy set-up-and-go accompaniment for rock and pop productions, but I like generating a bunch of beats with it that fit the groove of the song, rendering it all to midi, and then throwing up some Battery or Ultrabeat presets or my own kits and see what happens.  Throw some reverb on the results, or some delay, or just bounce and reverse, and I usually end up with some awesome and crazy sounding accidents.
     
    I also really like natural sounding drums.  Actually, one of the reasons I'm making more breakbeat stuff than psytrance and psydub is that I don't like working with artificial, synthetic sounding drums all that much.  Some people do it really well, and I have nothing against it... It just doesn't get me dancing in my seat when I'm working.  For that, it seems I like a good vinyl break or some shuffling snares played with a drummer's touch.  
     
    One of my drummer friends comes over often with his electric drum kit, and that's a hoot.  We'll just jam 90-110bpm funky grooves for hours, and I'll record the midi output of his kit.  Then, when he leaves, I've got literally hours of natural-feeling, just so slightly and beautifully off-the-grid drum grooves to work with.  
  21. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to neil (spatialize) in EQing   
    yes.. also a pair of open back headphones too for studio use.
     
    I recently bought a pair of beyerdynamic dt770's and am wondering how I ever managed without them.  good thing is you can listen to your Walkman with them and habituate yourself to how the music sounds on your headphones, something I don't do a lot of in my own studio room.
     
    talking of rooms....rooms are strange beasts with their lumpy reflections.  If I put the gear along the long wall in my room the bass reflections are unworkable.  so the gear goes along the short wall in my room and if you sit 3 cm further back than half way in the room you get a gigantic bass multiplication swell and you start to doubt your own sanity.  I often like to stand by the window and have a pipe and look out at the garden whilst listening through to the arrangement of a track.  problem is the bass sounds stupid at the back of the room, so you have to momentarily turn off your eq production brain and go into creative / arrangement mode.
     
    play some decent reference material in your room and move around and find the sweet spot (x marks the spot) in the room where everything sounds balanced.  you can always go and sit there momentarily if you want to check the balance of the mix.
     
    In terms of basic volume balancing, I often find that the old listening from outside the room trick is the best.   
  22. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Lorn in EQing   
    I EQ as I go, but I don't worry about getting it "perfect" right away.  Unless I have to render the channel for some reason, simple EQing doesn't take much CPU, so I can mess around with it as needed until I'm ready to render a track.
     
    Kicks may get EQed to sound punchier/less boxy/more subby.  Snares may get EQed to have more bite or sizzle.  Hats usually get EQed to take off the low end.  
     
    I'll EQ my drum bus before it goes into a few layers of saturation/compression (to control what gets distorted), and I'll EQ it after if it needs it (for overall drum balance).
     
    I ruthlessly hipass anything with too much low end energy if it conflicts with the bass or kick.  
     
    I try not to EQ using EQ plugins if I can help it.  If my saturator has a filter built in, I'll use that, for example.  Or I'll just use different distortions themselves to boost/cut the lows or highs.
     
    Synths and recorded sounds will get EQed if they need it to fit the mix, but while I don't think there is anything wrong with a 16db cut or boost if you need it, major EQing to fit a sound into the mix is often a strong sign that I should have chosen sounds that didn't clash so much.  Usually, I'll just change a synth or take something out entirely rather than try to wrestle with infinite mud.
     
    I have a nice gentle EQ on my master because I see no reason not to.  I used to avoid this because everyone told me this is a bad idea.  But more often then not, a 3db cut or boost on the master actually sounds better (to me anyways) than going back and working with individual channels. An EQ on the master really makes me feel in control of the overall feel and vibe of my mix.  YMMV.  
     
    Everyone seems to do their own thing or have their own "rules" for EQing.  Curious to see what other people's workflow is.  But I do think blanket advice like "never boost more than +6db" is misleading, especially with synthetic music.  Who is anyone to decide what a squelchy space fart is supposed to sound like "naturally?"  
  23. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Lorn in Tips for atmospheric/psychill sound synthesis   
    Hey OP - can you post an example of anything you are making (or, an example of a song that does this really well that you like) ?
     
    Some ideas for pads:
     
    - Are you layering stuff?  A lot of great pad sounds are 2 or 3 or more pads layered (with one pad providing the low-mid warmth, another providing maybe the mid-range melodic component, and another providing the top-end shimmer).
     
    - What synths are you using/ are you only using synths?  Stretched-out melodic sounds, especially reversed, drenched in reverb can make amazing, organic pads that no one has ever heard before.  Synths like Omnisphere or Alchemy have lots of samples already for doing this, but you can just do it manually using warping in Ableton / Flex Time in Logic / etc.  
     
    - You said you are EQing out the mid frequencies - which ones?  I usually use pads to add extra warmth, movement, and depth into the mid frequencies.
     
    - EQ the left and the right channel differently!  I like to boost and cut a few frequencies differently on left and right channels to increase width.  Even better, slowly automate a different peak on each left/right channels.
     
    - Delay, chorus, reverb are all good for this, but can maybe sound bland if they are just used as static effects.  Do you automate your reverb sends or chorus amounts?  
    Some ideas:
    -- My favourite: I like to automate the reverb send up while automating a lo-pass filter down on the original pad.  This will make it sound like it is moving farther away, giving a great sense of front-to-back depth.  The reverse works well, too.  Or with a hi-pass filter.  
    -- Try a chorus with a very low rate but high intensity, automate the mix from 20% to 80% every 1/2/4 beats, then quickly back down.  This will make it sound like it is "pumping" from centred to wide with each pulse of the beat.  I like to combine this with regular side-chaining to a kick etc.  
    -- Old trick: automate the delay send, and then send that delay to itself.  Be careful because this might get loud, but if we do it carefully, we can make a pad (or any sound) turn into a completely different, ultra organic ambient soundscape of throbbing echoes.  If you want width, use a stereo delay (or maybe a flanger/phaser on the delay channel).  
     
    - Panning rather than widening... less is often more in production.  If you make everything detuned and wide, your song doesn't sound wide - it sounds like stereo mud. Panning some sounds left and some sounds right - and especially automating the pan - is often way better than just making something wide.  
     
    - Autopan plugins are great, but I like to automate the rate or width to keep them from sounding static.
     
    - Sometimes mono reverbs work really well for localizing a sound in the mix. I like to make sounds panned left, send it to a mono reverb channel, panned right.  On its own, this isn't as impressive as a big wide wet delay.  But in the mix, it is sometimes so much more spacious.  We can do the same with delay - then maybe try automating the pan of that delay from right to left again.  
     
    - Same philosophy, polyphony: too much polyphony can also make things unfocused, especially when working with bass/pads/atmospheres/multiple melodies.  Sometimes I like to think like in jazz, where the bass can play the root note and the pads can play the 3rd/7th/9th etc.  Leaves a lot of harmonic space for melodic instruments.
     
    - My other favourite: you need a microphone to do this, but even a cheap microphone is fine because we are trying to make weird sounds anyways right? Solo the pad you want, put the microphone somewhere in the room, maybe pointed at a wall away from the speakers, or even in the hallway, whatever... record 8 or 16 bars.  Move the microphone around to a totally different spot, do it again.  Then, pan one recording left and the other right.  We should have a very wide sounding pad, with lots of room echoes and reflections making it organic and interesting.  
     
    I have a million more ideas if this is helpful at all.  Just remember - there is such a thing as too wide.  1 ultra-wide sound and 4 sounds swirling in automated panning will sound bigger and more spacious than 5 ultra-wide sounds.  
  24. Like
    Matt Freak Flag got a reaction from Gagarin Project in Delays in psybient production   
    Soundtoys Crystalizer does what it does really well.  Turns mundane sounds into shimmering psychedelic atmospheres, and turns psychedelic sounds into some real trippy shit. 
  25. Like
    Matt Freak Flag reacted to neil (spatialize) in 432Hz/440Hz   
    the 440 conspiracy is run by the SAME people as the ones who make the chemtrails 
     
    OBVS
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