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neil (spatialize)

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  1. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from YuriNondual in Spatialize - Beyond the Radar (2019) [Self Released] (psychedelic, ambient, world, space rock)   
    New album innit.
     
    http://www.spatialize.bandcamp.com/album/beyond-the-radar
  2. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Psilopylot in a Man got to eat   
    Since using Bandcamp and self releasing the music income now pays for music gear....software, synths etc. So it has become self supporting which is nice.
     
    It's a little bit easier these days to combine creativity with a normal job as music technology is that much more immediate. For a few hundred quid you can stuff a pc with a fully functioning studio in a few hours. Back in the Atari / sampler / synths days putting a studio together was expensive and time consuming. Now you can lob a loop from Ableton into a sequencer and it will time stretch itself instead of spending a good couple of hours lining up a loop in a sampler. My first sampler had 8 mono samples, 30 seconds of mono sampling time and cost me £500 second hand. Do we appreciate this? Probably not, it probably just pushes our expectations up.
     
    In general there are very very few people making a living from music nowadays. Even Philip Glass worked as a taxi driver and plumber while he wrote music for 18 musicians. Then within that larger music industry you have to realise that psy chill is a very very small niche. I think part of Ott's success (aside from writing very good stuff) is the fact that dub music has a certain crossover element. Dub and reggae is very popular with a broad range of people beyond the psychill community. He can tour America and play with other dub or dubstep artists as well as the psychedelic festivals. Good formula that.
     
    Life did throw up the opportunity a few years ago to work more solidly on music. So I took it. And I can say that immersing yourself in something is a very worthwhile thing to do in life, particularly if it's something that you are really interested in. I definitely took my productions up to another level. Through teaching myself and asking questions on forums and now I know my way around the gear I can easily write good sounding music around a normal job (but then again I don't have children). But in terms of sitting down all day every day to write music, my experience is that it does suck a little bit of the magic or of it. But it also has its own rewards.
     
    But that sense of achievement can be achieved in plenty of areas of life. Doesn't have to be music. Plastering, being a waiter, understanding finance... There's a joy in life from applying yourself to something and seeing the rewards. For sure. It makes more sense to throw that type of energy into something that you know will allow you to live well and enjoy your life.. But well...music has a beautiful lure. It may not be the sane or economic choice in life but, well, when that groove finally slots together, you can't beat that feeling.
     
    My advice to anyone starting out in creating music is to enjoy the creativity more than the production, and allow the production side to gradually build up as you finish tracks. You can write /arrange good tracks without decent production (you can!) but you can't write decent tracks that connect with people if you've spent 10 years obsessing over compressors and limiters.
     
    I hardly ever thought about production for years. I just made music. But when I heard Ott Hallucinogen in Dub I started to look more at that side of things. Ott definitely raised the bar in psychill..and I thought my music was pants in comprison. I had crap monitoring, terrible eq habits and hardly knew how to use a compressor... But you know what? It turned that Ott was listening to my first album (Dryads Bubble) in his car for ten years. For me that was proof that electronic music is still about creativity and expression... and not production values.
  3. Like
    neil (spatialize) reacted to neil (spatialize) in Headphones recommendations   
    Find the DDT 900 aren't very "live" sounding. Be nice to have something with s little more phizz
  4. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from continuum in EQing   
    Good advice above. Particularly about cutting the lower eq IF it conflicts with the kik and bass. Only if.
     
    I try to think about sound as filling a whole spectrum and the various components of the track as occupying particular layers within that overall sound. And using eq to make those layers fit together.
     
    First job before you reach for your eq is to create sounds that naturally fit within the sonic spectrum so that less eq and compression is required for the track to work. Creates a more natural sounding mix that people will want to come back to.
     
    If you choose your sounds well and sequence them well then you can go a long way into a track without reaching for the eq. I usually get well into the arrangement stage of a track before thinking much about eq and compression.
     
    At a track level, which is where you start eq'ing, I would say that I mostly use subtractive eq'ing. I.e. Cutting frequencies instead of boosting (though sometimes a healthy boost is just what is needed).
     
    To explain subtractive eq a little... Imagine you want a synth pad that fits between a rhythmic mid frequency part at 1khz and an upper synth at 10khz so You create a pad sound that broadly fits but, let's say the pad conflicts with the mid frequency rhythmic part at1khz.
     
    What I used to do when started off was to boost the area between 3-8khz. While the pad may well sound better initially this keeps those lower mids of your pad sound fairly high in the mix and still conflicting with that rhythmic part at 1khz.
     
    If you just cut the pad where it is conflicting with the rhythm at 1khz... and then raise the volume of the pad track... then you are effectively filling that same gap on the sonic spectrum but you are creating more space in your mix and this can help maintain headroom. If you still feel the need to make a eq boost then it can be a very minimal boost just to bring it a bit of flavour in the pad sound.
     
    This may not seemingly make a big difference on just one track but if you apply this technique cumulatively across a whole mix you will start to notice that your mixes sound more natural.
     
    Don't know if that makes sense or not. But that's a big part of my process.
     
    Another way to look at it is this... Put your eq spectrum analyser on. See where the lumps in the sound are. If you can cut those lumps without changing the character of the sound, then it's probably safe to cut.
     
    Also at a track level, if you do have to do severe cuts or boosts on a sound I normally do that before a compressor, as the first eq is working to balance out the sound... otherwise the compressor is working on parts of the spectrum that it doesn't need to. You can always put another eq after a compressor if you need to add a little spice back to the sound, as compression can often dullen sounds.
     
    I.usually find that more severe cuts and boosts are required on the more experimental sounds which are undergoing multiple plug in processes. More workaday sounds in the mix like hi hats etc often require only mild eq'ing.
     
    When it comes to eq on a group bus I will use very gentle slopes, mostly boosts at that point. I put that after very gentle bus compression.
     
    Generally 80hz is a good spot for depth on bass. 200hz a good spot for adding punch to bass. 500hz to 1khz can be a muddy area and I don't boost much in this area.
     
    Boosts around 1khz add a bit of rhythmic bite. Anything from 10khz upwards adds fresh air. Boosts to sounds anywhere in the mid range often initially sound good but you can easily overdo it if you have a lot of sounds going on.
     
    Also I tend to use the channel eq in logic for normal cuts. But if I want to boost eq, particularly on a bus, I will use the nicest eq I have as boosting colours the sound more than cutting.
     
    Eq is mainly about knowing the sound of your monitoring system really and working at sane volume levels. Don't eq with your music loud. Eq at a quiet level first and then see how it translates when you turn it up.
  5. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Johnny Mandrake in 432Hz/440Hz   
    the 440 conspiracy is run by the SAME people as the ones who make the chemtrails 
     
    OBVS
  6. Like
    neil (spatialize) reacted to via'on in Headphones recommendations   
    My favorites headphones:
     
    Live setup: Sennheiser HD-25 (good isolation, nice bass and power)
    Studio setup: Beyerdynamics DT-770 (closed) or DT-990 (open) (can be used for hours, warm bass, smooth treble)
  7. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Johnny Mandrake in Mobile applications   
    Got it sorted now. Thanks for the backup Johnny
  8. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Johnny Mandrake in Mobile applications   
    Johnny j got iDensity for the iPhone after your recommendation. It's just what I was looking for. Thanks.
  9. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from IooN-Cosmic Downtempo in Mastering services for psybient and related genres   
    Don't forget Gregg from Hermetech Mastering!  He did my 2014 Spatialize albums and a fine job he did too.
  10. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from yiannis in Has the genre been getting worse or better over time?   
    I think with the older producers (and I include myself in this) music was a little harder won with more basic technology. You had to construct a track from core elements.
     
    Just managing a studio (what with atari, samplers with floppy disks and a room full of synths) and getting it all to work together was quite a feat and would only be done by people who really had a massive interest in producing music.  It was hard to be a dabbler in those days and even harder to release music.  Samples weren;t that amazing and were in a low bit rate so you had to be able to construct your own stuff, or be adventurous in sample searching.
     
    Now you can literally drag and drop and few samples and have the bare bones of a track and the means of releasing is easy.  Plus there are millions of amazing synths sounds on tap too.  So some of the basic elements required in track building get skipped.
     
    I think a lot of the difference lies int he lost art of sampling.  When you sample something - even a synth pad - and play it back at different scales on a keyboard, you get really unusual and unique things happening.  Samplers aren;t used so much now what with the flexible audio side of a DAW.  The sampler was once the heart of the system, functioning like a hard disk recorder really, and tracks would be made up of a slew of interesting, unique and self made sounds.  I think that's the key difference.
     
    With th above poster mentioning about more simple music - well once you had managed to get a well cool groove going with your army of synths and samplers then you wanted to milk it.  All the glitch effects which completely drown out most people's productions at the moment would have taken weeks to achieve on a sampler! 
  11. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Hermetech Mastering in Gregg Hermetech - 3 Hour Ambient Mix on Condesa Lucia (2016)   
    great artist list.  gonna check this one out.
  12. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from andorra in AstroPilot's tips   
    Yeah I used Tokyo dawn slick eq recently mastering an album. Nice interface. Good sound.
  13. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Lorn in AstroPilot's tips   
    Yeah I used Tokyo dawn slick eq recently mastering an album. Nice interface. Good sound.
  14. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Matt Freak Flag in Snare reverb   
    you use logic?  There's a Big Drum Room impulse in there.  That is very nice on snares or on a full loop (filtered a little maybe). 
     
    Plus I find a bit of either spring reverb  or plate on top of something like that is the way forward. The big drum reverb to add depth and the spring (or a plate) to add a bit of a ring or upper / mid freq spaciousness to the sound.. 
     
    So yeah I find a couple of subtle applications of 2 types of reverb works best for me.
  15. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Matt Freak Flag in 432Hz/440Hz   
    The real conspiracy is that people who play off conspiracy theories against each other are trying to degrade the notion that there is anything conspiratorial going on in the world at all and thus produce a generation of sheep who have the notion of conspiracy debunked. thus I deduce Matt the you are a high powered venusian lizard who will suck out my brains with a straw as soon as look at me.
     
    ;-)
  16. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Matt Freak Flag in Percussion   
    i've already used a couple of those breakbeats matt.  
  17. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from yiannis in 2016/08/19-21 Whirly Fayre (Glastonbury UK)   
    ah Gong.  Yes. One of my favourites and in 2000 they were really cooking with Zero to Infinity album.  At that time they had a GREAT live band and they concentrated more on the spacey funk / jazz side of their style.
     
    Late nineties were a really good time for music in the UK.  Trance music was just developing and a lot of those were from the psychedelic scene.  Eat Static, Ozrics and Banco de Gaia even got in the charts for a short period.
  18. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Lorn in Percussion   
    NICE one!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    Thanks Matt. :-)
  19. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from andorra in a Man got to eat   
    Since using Bandcamp and self releasing the music income now pays for music gear....software, synths etc. So it has become self supporting which is nice.
     
    It's a little bit easier these days to combine creativity with a normal job as music technology is that much more immediate. For a few hundred quid you can stuff a pc with a fully functioning studio in a few hours. Back in the Atari / sampler / synths days putting a studio together was expensive and time consuming. Now you can lob a loop from Ableton into a sequencer and it will time stretch itself instead of spending a good couple of hours lining up a loop in a sampler. My first sampler had 8 mono samples, 30 seconds of mono sampling time and cost me £500 second hand. Do we appreciate this? Probably not, it probably just pushes our expectations up.
     
    In general there are very very few people making a living from music nowadays. Even Philip Glass worked as a taxi driver and plumber while he wrote music for 18 musicians. Then within that larger music industry you have to realise that psy chill is a very very small niche. I think part of Ott's success (aside from writing very good stuff) is the fact that dub music has a certain crossover element. Dub and reggae is very popular with a broad range of people beyond the psychill community. He can tour America and play with other dub or dubstep artists as well as the psychedelic festivals. Good formula that.
     
    Life did throw up the opportunity a few years ago to work more solidly on music. So I took it. And I can say that immersing yourself in something is a very worthwhile thing to do in life, particularly if it's something that you are really interested in. I definitely took my productions up to another level. Through teaching myself and asking questions on forums and now I know my way around the gear I can easily write good sounding music around a normal job (but then again I don't have children). But in terms of sitting down all day every day to write music, my experience is that it does suck a little bit of the magic or of it. But it also has its own rewards.
     
    But that sense of achievement can be achieved in plenty of areas of life. Doesn't have to be music. Plastering, being a waiter, understanding finance... There's a joy in life from applying yourself to something and seeing the rewards. For sure. It makes more sense to throw that type of energy into something that you know will allow you to live well and enjoy your life.. But well...music has a beautiful lure. It may not be the sane or economic choice in life but, well, when that groove finally slots together, you can't beat that feeling.
     
    My advice to anyone starting out in creating music is to enjoy the creativity more than the production, and allow the production side to gradually build up as you finish tracks. You can write /arrange good tracks without decent production (you can!) but you can't write decent tracks that connect with people if you've spent 10 years obsessing over compressors and limiters.
     
    I hardly ever thought about production for years. I just made music. But when I heard Ott Hallucinogen in Dub I started to look more at that side of things. Ott definitely raised the bar in psychill..and I thought my music was pants in comprison. I had crap monitoring, terrible eq habits and hardly knew how to use a compressor... But you know what? It turned that Ott was listening to my first album (Dryads Bubble) in his car for ten years. For me that was proof that electronic music is still about creativity and expression... and not production values.
  20. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from Matt Freak Flag in Percussion   
    www.aerodrums.com
     
    Anyone seen this?
  21. Like
    neil (spatialize) reacted to Geoglyph in a Man got to eat   
    PS I just downloaded 'On the Edge of Forever' for free. I promise I will be more generous next time I'm just quite inspired by that album right now. And broke.
  22. Like
    neil (spatialize) reacted to Matt Freak Flag in Percussion   
    +1
     
    I'm so glad other people do this too!  I pretty much never use the same percussion I started with.  First thing I do in a song is usually build drums and bass, but I'll almost always change the drums out later.  
     
    Drums are important for the vibe of a track; the right or wrong snare can make or break the feeling of a whole song.  Sometimes, just the reverb on the snare can make or break the sound of a song.  How am I supposed to know the vibe of the whole tune before it's made?  I'm not that good.  I like figuring things out as I go.  
     
    On another note, I've been using Logic's Drummer in weird ways to get interesting sounds.  It's meant to be an easy set-up-and-go accompaniment for rock and pop productions, but I like generating a bunch of beats with it that fit the groove of the song, rendering it all to midi, and then throwing up some Battery or Ultrabeat presets or my own kits and see what happens.  Throw some reverb on the results, or some delay, or just bounce and reverse, and I usually end up with some awesome and crazy sounding accidents.
     
    I also really like natural sounding drums.  Actually, one of the reasons I'm making more breakbeat stuff than psytrance and psydub is that I don't like working with artificial, synthetic sounding drums all that much.  Some people do it really well, and I have nothing against it... It just doesn't get me dancing in my seat when I'm working.  For that, it seems I like a good vinyl break or some shuffling snares played with a drummer's touch.  
     
    One of my drummer friends comes over often with his electric drum kit, and that's a hoot.  We'll just jam 90-110bpm funky grooves for hours, and I'll record the midi output of his kit.  Then, when he leaves, I've got literally hours of natural-feeling, just so slightly and beautifully off-the-grid drum grooves to work with.  
  23. Like
    neil (spatialize) reacted to yiannis in a Man got to eat   
    They did indeed. Sploosh-sploosh everywhere.
  24. Like
    neil (spatialize) reacted to yiannis in a Man got to eat   
    They did indeed. Sploosh-sploosh everywhere.
  25. Like
    neil (spatialize) got a reaction from yiannis in a Man got to eat   
    if you wanna learn psychill,
     
    1listen to ozrics until your ears bleed
    2learn a couple of synths inside out
    3 learn how to play the keyboards / piano
    4let the music flow. 
    5learn your daw and production stuff
    6use forums for feedback
    7don't rush into releasing
     
    :-)
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